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A Social Story About Social Care

July 20, 2013

Why Social Care Is So Shite

* Personalisation has been hijacked to cut costs.

* Fairer Charging Policies are unfair

* Person centred plans are system centred plans.

* Choice is no choice.

* Independence is about a reduced quality of life

* Fairer access to services are unfair.

* Families can just fuck off

* Processes render the individual invisible.

* Accountability doesn’t exist.

* Support plans are about affordability, not care.

If you disagree with any of the contents of this social story, please write to your category manager, transformation manager, transition champion, or Cannon and Ball.

The End.

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From → Social Care

19 Comments
  1. I totally agree with your comments Mark – you know my story of my son and the abusive way he has been treated – neglect seems part of the package – and because you become upset & want an explanation you are seen as problematic and the system isolates you.

    There are laws in place which my authority Liverpool City Council think they can work outside of – they talk the talk but don’t walk the walk.

    Mayor Anderson ignores my emails a public servant ignoring a member of the public and a vulnerable adult who in his care had a serious accident resulting in 4 operations. Liverpool City Council are void of compassion and empathy.

    Because of the neglect and working outside the law while in the care of Liverpool City Council my son has his 3rd operation next week – his 4th will be in September – he has been physically and psychologically greatly effected by what happened to him – it is heart breaking.

    The incident happened 5 months ago – and all everyone is concerned about is protecting the system no adverse publicity – Liverpool Council do not go in for reflection and responsibility – they have the attitude ”suffer in silence and keep it to yourself”….. well they can go and kiss my bony white bum…… this Mammy is on a heat seeking missile for Justice….

    If they treat my son like this when I’m alive how will they treat him when I’m dead…..

    Again Mark excellent writing saying how it is – Solidarity …………….

  2. Helen permalink

    It is horrific. Both my boys are sen and my dad was under care systems after a massive stroke. Both systems are, I struggle to think of a bad enough word to describe them, shite? It shouldn’t feel like us against the world. Keep up the good work, the more of us that speak out the better.

  3. Nick permalink

    Amen I say – my son has SLD / ASD and we having the same experiences.

  4. ellie permalink

    Everything you say is true. Having worked in the “care system” for some time,I can say it’s exactly as stated. Full of jargon, rules and regulations that have no real bearing on what a person really wants or needs. The excuse for this ? as ever lack of funding or money as it’s known to those outside the system. It’s just not a good enough excuse any more, especially when government continue to fail to deliver services to the people who need it most. Excellent blog.

  5. Perry Power permalink

    Not very balanced article or comments. Despite the failings of Social Care in the UK it is amongst the best in the world. It is provided by dedicated people who provide a high quality of service on limited wages. The people doing the work have a thankless task and I for one thank them.

    • Perry……………

      “It is provided by dedicated people who provide a high quality of service” such a sweeping statement – being involved in the system for 40 years – I have yet to see this high quality service in Adult Care you talk about.

      Another sweeping statement ” amongst the best in the world” – is this from 1st hand experience…..
      .
      We the unpaid carer have the thankless job…… we are never valued – and when we raise issues we are called problematic….

      Marks article says it how it is….. and until you walk in his shoes you cannot challenge his comments.

      I find Marks writing to be balanced and says it how it is…..

      http://keefe12.wordpress.com/2013/07/21/reflection-responsibility-my-arse/

      Solidarity.

    • Andy permalink

      Well put Perry. In my opinion it’s an awfully difficult job and the wages are certainly not representative of the stress caused and violence encountered.

      • violence encountered – how little you know about autism – if staff can’t stand the heat get out of the kitchen

      • Hi Perry. Thanks for your comments. I can only write from my own experience. If you read my posts, my frustration is usually with the system, not the people working in the system. Steven has a fantastic group of support workers who work with him on a daily basis and you’ll see throughout the blog, my love, appreciation and respect for these guys. Where despair sets in, it is usually that the social care people frame my son so bleakly compared to the funny, intelligent man that I live with. Mark

  6. Andrew Makin permalink

    My expertise lies in care of older people, and especially wthose with dementia, but there are exact parallels here. Once the system gets you, it gets you – except of course when the money runs out. Safeguarding older people does exactly the same sort of things as was done to Stephen, too.

  7. Sam Horsfield permalink

    I am a Mum to 15 year old twins with autism and complex learning difficulties. We have experienced the social care system and completely agree with everything you say. The whole system is a mess

  8. Perry……………

    “It is provided by dedicated people who provide a high quality of service” such a sweeping statement – being involved in the system for 40 years – I have yet to see this high quality service in Adult Care you talk about.

    Another sweeping statement ” amongst the best in the world” – is this from 1st hand experience…..
    .
    We the unpaid carer have the thankless job…… we are never valued – and when we raise issues we are called problematic….

    Marks article says it how it is….. and until you walk in his shoes you cannot challenge his comments.

    I find Marks writing to be balanced and says it how it is…..

    http://keefe12.wordpress.com/2013/07/21/reflection-responsibility-my-arse/

    Solidarity.

  9. Ali permalink

    couldn’t agree more… fearing the day my son turns sixteen.

  10. From someone that works in the “social-care” system, thankyou for doing this, the bs and jargon is something I really struggle to work around, most of my colleagues – who work really hard – just accept this. It breaks my heart to see people that need support getting pushed from pillar to post to satisfy criteria that is meaningless to them.

  11. My grieving son was labelled EBD, he’s dyslexic and showed signs of autism…he became a ‘school refuser’ and, at one time we had 12 ‘support’ / INTERVENTION officers. I de-registered him from school, moved away and took him travelling and guess what? he’s better now (gosh can’t imagine why)

  12. Mark, firstly, thanks for this blog, it is very well written, Not everyone will agree with your views for sure, but I certainly do.

    Four years ago, I quit the world of IT and moved into social care, as a support worker. Initially I was so absorbed with the learning curve that I was not always able to see the wood for the trees.
    Now, I am deeply disillusioned, I often see things that make me very unhappy, especially when common sense goes out the window because of some bizarre policy.

    My biggest frustration comes from the disregard of parental concerns, sometimes we pay lip service to parents views, sometimes we decide that parents are just wrong and we know better because we have had the training, we know much more about autism than parents do and we resent it when they do things that differ from our established practice.

    I feel very strongly that the people we support are individuals. We spend a lot of time compiling risk assessments, support plans, filling in charts, logs, diaries, all of these things which are well meaning and probably essential, but I feel that they do depersonalise the people we support. If we are thinking “I must record this” or I must put something in the diary so that Johnny’s parents don’t moan that he hasn’t been out, we risk seeing Johnny as a collection of files as much as a person who really does need our help to enable him to have a decent life.

    Martin

  13. I am the Director of a provider ( http://jcsp.org.uk/ ) who is trying to fully embrace the ‘new’ personalised approach being talked about by Local Authorities across the land. Time and time again we encounter blogs, opinions, receive calls and emails to the office about situations like this, yet time and time again our service is turned down by commissioners as it doesn’t ‘fit’ into one of their archaic boxes.

    All we want to do is provide Personal Assistants (PAs) to children and young adults with additional needs (ASD included), to allow them to live a life as independently and as close to their peer group as possible.

    Why shouldn’t a young lad with autism be able to pop to the pub for a pint with his Grandad if he so wishes? Or to troop off to watch his local football team play on a Saturday afternoon?

    By employing a PA, both the individual and their family/friends know they are doing what they want, but are also safe regardless of eventuality.

    The talk about personalisation, choice and self-directed support should be long over. The time for action is now. There are organisations such as ours who are out there and ready to assist….now if only the Local Authorities would start to acknowledge us and spread this information to those who need and are crying out for it! Unfortunately, many are social enterprises or charities who simply don’t have the budgets to pay for the publicity otherwise.

  14. Psych permalink

    As a psychologist working in the system the Jargon used by some managers takes my breath away.If one doesn’t agree with the prevailing jargon, as I didn’t, and the nonsense talked then as a worker in the system you become a problem as well. I agree with all Mark says. I want to throw up when I hear the word ’empowerment’. It is always used by the dictators in the system. Mark well done, keep your cool and keep on blogging.

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